At First Blush: Ideas for Decorating With Pale Pink

I am grateful every single day for the moment blush was declared the new neutral. I realize that my Apartment Therapy bio says I love mint—and that’s entirely true. But there’s something about a blushy, whispering rose color—in any of its forms, from pale pink to copper to apricot and peach—that just feels so fresh and current. Add a little—or a lot of—pink(ish) to your home by painting the walls, upholstering your sofa, or even tiling your floors. Want to see the world through rose-colored glasses? Take a peek at these beautiful blushing interiors.

Above: This London kitchen and breakfast room I found on Cup of Jo was designed by Jersey Ice Cream Co. And obviously if your company’s name is Jersey Ice Cream Co, then I expect to see a sweet, mouthwatering, drool-worthy interior. And this breakfast area fits the bill to a T. The space was designed along with the homeowner, Skye McAlpine, of the food blog From My Dining Table, and the way the natural light floods the room and highlights the blush walls is, well, delicious.

The only thing better than a blush sofa is a blush sofa paired with rose gold or copper like in this living room from House Beautiful UK. Black-and-white pillows and a gray striped rug neutralize the rosy hue.

Kelly Wearstler described this living room she designed for Cameron Diaz as being sexy but not flashy, just like Cameron. It’s not just the gorgeous grasscloth wallpaper here that makes me blush—it’s that the entire room is awash in a light pink, from the crocodile-print club chair down to the coppery accessories and even a blush coffee table book. If you haven’t see the full house on Elle Decor, it’s worth a peek.

Seattle-based designer Brian Paquette wrapped this nursery in an ombre Calico wallpaper and paired it perfectly with that sweet floral for the chair, crib and window treatment. That’s one lucky little baby.

You don’t have to be hit over the head with blush in order for it to take effect. This bedroom, which belongs to photographer and stylist Elle Fotografie, reads super soft and adorably chic with a pale throw blanket and barely-there pillows.

Okay, so this is cheating a little bit because it’s a restaurant and not a home (Moby 3143 in Armadale, Melbourne, Australia). But the color combo is killer and can be used in a residence just as easily as it is here. I mean, can’t you just picture a light blush and dark teal powder room? I’m trying to figure out how to get this look in my own home as I write this.

This living room from Elle Espana is a great example of why you shouldn’t neglect your ceilings. The pastel pink paint carries above onto the moldings, the ceiling, and the medallion holding the light fixture, modernizing the ornate detailing. The hashtag #lookup is popular for a reason people.

If you don’t want to commit all the way up to the ceiling, you can still get a unique effect by only partially painting your walls. This pretty-in-pink living room on the Bohemian modern blog SF Girl by Bay (originally shot by Clive Tompsett for Sköna Hem) keeps things interesting with contrasting white once your eye gets about three quarters of the way.

And who said pink paint has to be reserved for walls? This pale pink cabinetry found on Ideal Home (the work of John Lewis of Hungerford) is a subtle change from the cream island and gives the space an extra oomph.

My favorite part about this blushing dining room from Yvonne Eijkenduijn via Flickr isn’t actually the blush walls, though they are lovely. It’s the pink artwork above the fireplace. The tone-on-tone design move with a pop of red feels fun and fresh.

If you want to add a little pink to your bathroom but want to skip the paint, try tiling the walls in your favorite shade, like we see in a post by Oh Happy Day. When Jordan Ferney first moved into the home in question, the tiling was already there but the wall space above the tiles were painted blue. Switching them to white brightened the room and made the pink wall tiles and flooring feel much fresher and more modern.

In this kitchen, found on Idealista, the designer opted for blush as well, but instead of using it on the cabinetry, the open shelving got a dose of color. As a result, this kitchen is fun, eclectic and doesn’t take itself too seriously.

Here’s another example of painting traditional moldings a blushy pink to achieve a more modern-glam feel, found on Elle Decoration UK using Dulux’s Copper Blush paint. But why stop at pink walls? The light pink-sand hourglass and deep-blush glass vessel complement the walls but contrast it just enough to lend depth and interest to the vignette.

And in this scene also from Elle Decoration UK, Dulux’s Copper Blush paint mixes with neutrals and metallics, and the assortment of stone and woods makes this a more organic application of the color.

Stop the presses! There’s a pink Smeg refrigerator out there and everyone deserves to know about it. The fun and quirky appliance wouldn’t work in just any setting, but it was exactly what Krista Ewart needed for the guest-suite kitchen of a California beach bungalow she designed, shown in House Beautiful. (After ogling the fridge, please turn your attention to the scalloped edge of the countertop. What?!)

Every time I look at this sitting area Bellocq via Turbulences Deco, I feel like I’m dreaming, because it’s just such a dreamy setting! The blush velvet banquette and stools seem so rumply, soft and inviting. I’d like to curl up in this corner with a good book, a cup of tea and never leave.

If you’re trying to figure out how to incorporate pink in a unique way, you might consider your front door like Elsie Larson of A Beautiful Mess did. Her home, featured on Domino, shows you how to make quite the entrance and set the tone for the rest of your home.

In that same Domino feature, we see that pink carries into the bedroom in the rug, the accessories and even the sunset-kissed artwork by Max Wanger from One Kings Lane titled Country Line.

Ceiling beams! Why didn’t I think of ceiling beams?! The rugs and pillows, sure. And maybe even the light fixture. But the blush ceiling beams are really what gets me in this playful and cheery bedroom by Adam Hunter.

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