Peek Inside This Egg-cellent Tiny House in France

(Image credit: Corentin Schieb and Aurélie Poirrier via Inhabitat)

If you’re going to reinvent the egg, you’d better be sure to improve upon the original model. Fortunately, this tiny wooden pod situated near the banks of France’s Loire River does exactly that and then some.

(Image credit: Corentin Schieb and Aurélie Poirrier via Inhabitat)

Dubbed Mr. Plocq’s Caballon, this super cozy 160-square foot egg-shaped retreat in the woods takes its inspirational cues from Émile Plocq, a bird-charming “local from the Vendée region who supposedly built a ship meant to perform expeditions to the shores of Africa with the help of migrating birds,” according to Arch Daily. Architect trio Aurélie Poirrier, Igor-Vassili Pouchkarevtch-Dragoche, and Vincent O’Connor convened to create the project as a part of the annual “Imaginary Nights” festival where visitors are invited to call it home for the night between May and October.

(Image credit: Corentin Schieb and Aurélie Poirrier via Inhabitat)

Since 2013, the movable concept home has steadily attracted flocks of visitors hoping for a one-night stay. The frame was constructed using carpentry techniques from ship building and aircraft, which appear in its boat hull-like curve and a spacious window-filled interior that is modeled after the cockpit of a plane.

(Image credit: Corentin Schieb and Aurélie Poirrier via Inhabitat)

Guests can access the single-room space via a horizontal double-swing door. A partially transparent ceiling made of thick plastic and canvas lets in plenty of natural light and provides amazing views of the starry night sky. The bottom half of the oval-esque dormitory is made of bent wood. Despite its compact size, the pod is equipped with a double bed. A wooden door referred to as the “shower airlock” serves as a 360-degree rotating room divider that isolates the cockpit sleeping area from a hidden bathroom that contains a dry toilet and a sink. There’s still room for privacy, thanks to the door’s swiveling capabilities.

(Image credit: Corentin Schieb and Aurélie Poirrier via Inhabitat)

For a closer look at the structural components of this unique off-the-grid escape, head over to Inhabitat for an overview of the Mr. Plocq’s Caballon’s floor plans.

h/t Curbed

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